Adrian Mole

Adrian Mole Das geheime Tagebuch des Adrian Mole, 13 3/4 – Streams

Adrian Albert Mole ist der fiktive Protagonist einer Buchreihe der britischen Autorin Sue Townsend. Die Bücher sind in Form eines Tagebuchs abgefasst. Die Reihe umfasst insgesamt acht Titel, darüber hinaus existieren zwei Kompilationen, die. Adrian Albert Mole (* 2. April ) ist der fiktive Protagonist einer Buchreihe der britischen Autorin Sue Townsend. Die Bücher sind in Form eines Tagebuchs. Das geheime Tagebuch des Adrian Mole ist eine britische Kinder- und Jugendfernsehserie die , unter Regie von Peter Sasdy entstand. Für die Produktion. Das Intimleben des Adrian Mole, 13 3/4 Jahre: designarsenal.co: Sue Townsend, Antoinette Gittinger: Bücher. Adrian Mole collection 8 Books set. (Sue Townsend Adrian Mole series collecti | Adrian Mole | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit.

Adrian Mole

[0%/1] Die Leiden des jungen Adrian Mole. Adrian Mole ist ein ganz normaler Jugendlicher und so hat er auch die ganz normalen, altersbedingten Träume und​. Adrian Albert Mole ist der fiktive Protagonist einer Buchreihe der britischen Autorin Sue Townsend. Die Bücher sind in Form eines Tagebuchs abgefasst. Die Reihe umfasst insgesamt acht Titel, darüber hinaus existieren zwei Kompilationen, die. Adrian Albert Mole (* 2. April ) ist der fiktive Protagonist einer Buchreihe der britischen Autorin Sue Townsend. Die Bücher sind in Form eines Tagebuchs. Ein Buch, read more mir schlicht gefiel. In der zweiten Staffel ist Adrian 15 — aber sonst ändert sich wenig. Jahrhundert Literatur Die Frau, die ein Jahr im Bett blieb. Lernmaterialien Buch. Man kann sich fast bei jedem Tagebucheintrag kringelig lachen. Somit gehört es nunmehr zu meinen Lieblingsbüchern. Rezensionen und Bewertungen Neu. Ich denke die this web page würden sich biegen vor Lachen. Zu allem übel erpresst ihn auch noch Berry Kent. Adrian Mole Ja, er hat grosse Probleme damit. Sortieren: Standard Hilfreichste Neueste. TheSaint vor 11 Jahren. Wächst sein Bart schnell genug und ist sein Penis nicht doch zu klein geraten? Das Buch an sich ist schon Robert Geissini sehr witzig, ich fand https://designarsenal.co/deutsche-filme-online-stream/super-size-me-deutsch-stream.php Ende nur etwas abrupt. Read more Cappuccino-Jahre. Man kann ganz ehrlich Tränen lachen bei dem tollen Buch. Allerdings sind die Tagebucheinträge wirklich absolut witzig, humorvoll und saukomisch geschrieben. Auch die Pubertät wird für Adrian zum Problem: Sind Brustschwellungen bei visit web page dreizehnjährigen normal? Es läuft auch nicht immer rund mit seiner jährigen Freundin. Ich habe mir die Adrian Mole gerade bei Pidax Michael Haneke, darauf warte ich seit Jahre. Zum Schluss wurde es etwas nachdenklicher. Ein humorvolles, witziges, empfehlenswertes Buch. Für diese, und insbesondere für den Schläger Berry Kent, ist Mole https://designarsenal.co/deutsche-filme-online-stream/sto-serien-stream.php ein Opfer, welches es zu terrorisieren gilt. Deutschsprachige Erstausstrahlung. Lebensjahr Einzelkind. Die Frau, die ein Jahr im Bett blieb. Ein Continue reading, dass mir schlicht gefiel. Auch die Pubertät wird für Adrian zum Problem: Sind Brustschwellungen bei einem dreizehnjährigen normal? Continue reading von Sue Townsend. Mit den kraftstrotzenden rauen Jungen aus der Nachbarschaft will er nichts zu tun haben. Kurzmeinung: Ein sehr witziges und hunmorvolles Tagebuch!

I don't know if this will be the last book in the series, but if it is, the ending is surprisingly upbeat, and leaves a tiny bit of hope, however infinitesimal, that Adrian's future could contain possibly the smallest ray of sunshine.

Or, not View 1 comment. Jan 04, Sarah rated it really liked it. As I started reading The Prostate Years in the midst of an outpouring of Christmas presents, many of which included novels, annuals and book tokens, I was spoiled for literary choice over the holidays, and almost didn't know where to start.

However, Adrian has remained my first love ever since the day I picked up my dad's battered old copy of 'The Secret Diary'.

He would have to be read first, no questions asked. I hurried through the book feverently, but was hit with bitter disappointment as I As I started reading The Prostate Years in the midst of an outpouring of Christmas presents, many of which included novels, annuals and book tokens, I was spoiled for literary choice over the holidays, and almost didn't know where to start.

I hurried through the book feverently, but was hit with bitter disappointment as I sped-read through the last few entries. I dearly hope that Sue Townsend hasn't decided to call it a day as far as her greatest character is concerned.

Despite his ever-changing and often ridiculous circumstances, Adrian as a character has never changed. Even at 40 years of age, he is still naive to his wayward wife's adultery with the local landlord, tactless but only on occasion and weak when it comes to handling his eccentric little girl, Gracie, and jealous of his half-siblings, Rosie and Brett and the attention they receive from his parents, Pauline and George.

And then of course, there is his benign love for Pandora, a desire for her which transcends throughout the series from his 's hormone-ridden schooldays.

However, each and every one of Adrian's vast problems is put into perspective when he receives some gut-wrenching news from his GP Townsend's treatment of Adrian from the beginning is unabashed and harsh, as she continuously sends him on wild escapades and gives him so much self-absorption and naivety that he is set up for some sort of downfall; in this novel, however, the main battle he faces is dealt with delicately and empathically.

The great thing is that Adrian's character remains constant throughout each and every difficulty; pitying his life and longing for an existence of respect, literary success and, of course, Ms.

The humour synonymous with Townsend's style, and this series in particular, is still there, but different in the sense that instead of laughing bitterly at Adrian and his pathetic situations, instead we feel his pain and journey through the book alongside him, tittering at what we observe along the way.

I sincerely hope that this is not the last in a brilliant line of diaries, as for once Sue treats Adrian with a bit of - well, if not happiness then inner peace at last - and I would love to see this chapter in his life developed.

If it is the end, hoever, then at least Adrian has not been conquered by his problems, and we see him finally acheive some sort of hope, and leave behind a chapter of his life to walk into the sunset horizon All in all a humourous but touching read about life and how it can seem pointless at times, but how there is a reason for all the pointlessness.

A must for any fans of the series; just because Adrian is getting old doesn't mean his comic value is too!

Aug 03, Gemma Scott rated it it was amazing. My favourite of the Adrian Mole series. The book where I connected to him most.

Unlike other reviewers I've always liked Adrian Mole as a character despite his many flaws but in this book because of the fact he had cancer and because he had matured e.

I also enjoyed reading about Bernard, the alcoholic booklover, who plays a greater part i My favourite of the Adrian Mole series.

I also enjoyed reading about Bernard, the alcoholic booklover, who plays a greater part in this book. Apr 16, Ben Baker rated it really liked it.

I can't deny I've been putting off finishing this one for a while now. Despite its excruciating romantic plots, " Mass Destruction" once again left Adrian happy and loved.

A few years on and reality has come crashing back in with a strained marriage, stroppy daughter, mooching half-brother, son still fighting the Taliban and a failing bookshop pushing Mole back to the safety of his diaries.

Things still manage to get worse when Adrian becomes ill. Funny but painful, like it was happening to a I can't deny I've been putting off finishing this one for a while now.

Funny but painful, like it was happening to a close friend, which in many ways, he has become. The ending will probably not satisfy traditionalists, not least of all now it has become the default ending by Townsend's tragic death but then nothing was ever simple in the world of Adrian Mole.

You will both be missed hugely. Very disappointed to note that Adrian Mole, who was always a year older than me, has somehow lost a year making us the same age.

Who will I look up to now? I blame the publishers, simply because Sue Townsend can do no wrong. I will be writing to my MP on the matter in the strongest of terms.

Does anyone have Dr Braithwaite's address? Adrian goes through the book moaning that people can't spell the name of his troublesome gland correctly and as a result I mis-type the name of the book when searching for it.

Adrian 1 - CaterinaAnna 0 I first met Adrian in the pages of Woman's Realm in , when I was just enough older than him to feel superior, and each new installment of his diaries is like getting a news-filled letter from a friend one hears from infrequently enough for it to contain plenty of news, but frequently enough for Adrian goes through the book moaning that people can't spell the name of his troublesome gland correctly and as a result I mis-type the name of the book when searching for it.

Adrian 1 - CaterinaAnna 0 I first met Adrian in the pages of Woman's Realm in , when I was just enough older than him to feel superior, and each new installment of his diaries is like getting a news-filled letter from a friend one hears from infrequently enough for it to contain plenty of news, but frequently enough for one not to wonder why they've bothered.

In his forties, Adrian still has all the faults that make us cringe and wonder why we love him, but he has had some of the rough edges rubbed off and greets yet another lost job, lost wife and disappointing child with his usual bewildered acceptance.

Pandora is still his ideal, in spite of continuing to use him for her own ends, but she even she is not enough to make up for the reality Adrian has to bear in this book.

As ever, simultaneously hilarious and sad. View 2 comments. Nov 20, J. So, farewell then, Adrian Mole, the 80s parody of parochial adolescence which mutated into the author's most well-received series of satirical soapboxes on modern-day Britain.

Plotlines which were presumably destined for resolution in later books turn into cul-de-sacs. We'll never know how, or if, the stories were goin So, farewell then, Adrian Mole, the 80s parody of parochial adolescence which mutated into the author's most well-received series of satirical soapboxes on modern-day Britain.

We'll never know how, or if, the stories were going to end. Although that's assuming they were going to end at all: one of the prominent characters in 'Weapons of Mass Destruction' is absent without explanation.

Five years have passed, sure, but not even a passing mention? Townsend's arc with Mole in the later books is always to begin with the happiness Mole concludes the previous book with and gradually strip it away, but even by these standards, the coal-black abyss that Adrian is sentenced to here is like something out of a Russian play.

Adulterous wife, job in difficulties, cancer - and that's just for starters. But then maybe that's the point.

Life at the bottom of the social ladder isn't easy. When you're seriously considering your appearance on 'Jeremy Kyle' and your best suit has been ruined because you left Starburst in it, there's nothing more than gallows humour getting you through it.

Plus, this is after all an Adrian Mole book, and there's even something resembling fan service towards the end. We'll have to hope that Mole found the happiness that eluded him throughout the series, as it sure as heck deserted him here.

Adrian Mole has been making me laugh since I was 13, and he's still doing it now that I'm 29 It's my birthday today! He's now at the grand old age of 39 and is on his third marriage.

And still not been published by the BBC! I think the reason I, and so many others like these books, is that you can find situations in here that you recognise in your own family and sometimes in yourself.

Adrian's mum telling the story of his birth on his birthday for example. Every year! I know someone like this Adrian Mole has been making me laugh since I was 13, and he's still doing it now that I'm 29 It's my birthday today!

I know someone like this ; hi mum! The commentary on politics is hilarious and I laughed out loud so many times.

I'm really sad that this is the last book. I would have loved to read Adrian's thoughts on Brexit and Trump!

If you haven't read any of the Mole books yet, why not? Surely these books are a teenage rite of passage. Head to the nearest bookstore immediately.

View all 4 comments. Jun 15, Iona Stewart rated it it was amazing. Adrian is now approaching 40, his son Glenn is in Afghanistan fighting the Taliban, Adrian is having problems with his prostate and his marriage to Daisy is falling apart.

Adrian is living in a converted pigsty and working at a bookshop. Mr Carlton-Hughes who owns the bookshop is ill.

He is still an incessant letter-wri Adrian is now approaching 40, his son Glenn is in Afghanistan fighting the Taliban, Adrian is having problems with his prostate and his marriage to Daisy is falling apart.

He is still an incessant letter-writer. He writes to a man who has attained the advanced age of pestering him about how he has kept his hair.

Apparently Adrian has not. He has written a play, Plague! He informs us that he is 20 per cent agnostic and 80 per cent atheist, but still feels guilty about not going to church.

Tony Blair has finally resigned as leader of the Labour party and will be standing down as P.

Gordon Brown is the new PM and Adrian immediately commences to write to him and ask him to look into his tax affairs.

Daisy now weighs thirteen stone twelve ounces, which would be great if she were a light-heavyweight boxer. It is raining incessantly.

On Sunday 1st July smoking in a public place or place of work is forbidden. This is no doubt taken from real life. Daisy meets Hugo Fairfax-Lycett, soon to be her lover.

It turns out that Adrian has cancer so his life revolves around his visits to the hospital for chemo treatments. I understand from the dedications at the beginning of the book that Sue Townsend herself had health problems while writing the book and in general I know had severe health problems.

As always with Adrian his unusual family are causing endless problems, his marriage is not working, his daughter rules their home and her school, the bookstore where Adrian works is about to close and Adrian has some health concerns.

What I love most about the Adrian Mole books is their humour and how they show all aspects of family life, my favourite character is George Mole, Adrian's Dad, whose one liners are memorable throughout all the books, in 'The Prostate Years', you see a softer side to him.

A funny, poignant read, enjoy! Having grown up with Adrian Mole, I was desperately hoping that this one would not disappoint.

It didn't. Great fun start to finish. The opening couple of weeks in particular - getting you back into the picture, reminding you of characters whilst introducing new ones etc.

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He is generally honest and always tries to do the right thing, sometimes leaving him open to manipulation by the less scrupulous.

To his credit he is meticulously tidy and well-groomed, with an acute eye for dress standards even in his teens.

However, he is often excessively fussy, petty and jealous, overly critical of other people's shortcomings, and shows a lack of common sense or organisational ability.

Considering himself to have elevated intellectual and cultural tastes, he listens to classical music.

He coerced himself to read such books as War and Peace or The Wittgenstein Primer as a teenager, looking down on people who enjoy lower, more popular literature and music.

He eagerly embraces radical political views in his youth, but is acually very conservative in his tastes and outlook, becoming more right-wing as he ages he himself recognises that trend.

This is evident in his tendancy to form close friendship with the elderly, such as Bert Baxter ; as his mother once put it: "Adrian, you were "born old.

Overall, Adrian is an average man with many normal human shortcomings, but has a very good heart and deals with life's challenges in a manner sometimes comic, but always honest.

He has a timeless appeal to the everyman sentiment in all readers. He is not particularly clever or athletic, but gets average grades and has a few friends.

At the age of 14 he comes to fancy himself an intellectual, beginning to write poetry. He finds his first girlfriend, Pandora Braithwaite , although he does not lose his virginity until several years later.

Both of Adrian's parents have affairs, leading to two separations and subsequent reunions; Adrian and Pandora likewise got through a number of rough spots.

Their young love, which forms the very core of Adrian's emotional life, is kept strong by mutual appreciation of art, literature, left-wing politics and romantic ideals.

They are completely honest and comfortable with each other, going to the extent of discussing marriage. A habitual worrier, he broods endlessly about his acne, his parents' marital difficulties, and his relationship with Pandora.

He is bullied for a time by Barry Kent , although he later joins his Barry's gang. When Pandora departs for university, Adrian remains devoted to her and corresponds regularly, but she gradually and inevitably leaves him behind.

Adrian's first job after leaving school is at the local library, since he wished to immerse himself in literature; he finds the work far less rewarding than he expected - indeed, he lost his job after amalgamating Romantic Fiction with Modern Classics, much to the disgust of his boss, who proceeds to have an argument with Adrian about the relevance of Jane Austen.

Adrian is forced to leave home when he is 20, as he lied that he had gotten married when he hadn't, as his mother is determined to rent out his room.

Moving in briefly with his then-girlfriend Sharon Bott and her family is nightmarish; he soon relocates to Oxford, where Pandora allows him to stay in the box room of her flat.

Adrian manages to get a job as newt conservation officer at the Department of the Environment by faking an A-Level Biology certificate.

He comes to despise his job, but remains there for about 2 years, all the while suffering the torment of watching Pandora get involved with a variety of other men.

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Uli geb. Aufgrund ihrer eigenen Erblindung, ausgelöst durch Diabetes , gab die Autorin nach dem Erscheinen des 6. Deutsche Erstausstrahlung: Die Cappuccino-Jahre. Adrian Mole ist ein ganz normaler Jugendlicher und so hat er auch die ganz normalen, altersbedingten Träume und die ganz normalen, altersbedingten Probleme: Pickel, Schule und Mädchen. Stefanie Hasse Pretty Dead. Hauptseite Themenportale Zufälliger Artikel.

His son is fighting in Afghanistan. His daughter's obsession with Di " His daughter's obsession with Disney Princesses may get her booted out of school.

And his wife is dressing up to meet with another man Adding to the woes are a looming redundancy, a professor who keeps hitting on him, Gordon Brown's refusal to answer his letters, and lingering fantasies of old flame, Pandora.

Even the Christmas lights are problematic. Oh, and Adrian's also been having some prostate trouble, the "old man's disease," as everyone insists on calling it.

This book may seem particularly laden with horrors, but it's really all just another chapter in the angst ridden life of Adrian Mole, and of all the Adrian Moles in the world, he is definitely the Adrian Moleiest.

There are plenty of laughs, and more than a few touching moments, mostly between Mole and his employer, the bookstore owner, Mr.

I don't know if this will be the last book in the series, but if it is, the ending is surprisingly upbeat, and leaves a tiny bit of hope, however infinitesimal, that Adrian's future could contain possibly the smallest ray of sunshine.

Or, not View 1 comment. Jan 04, Sarah rated it really liked it. As I started reading The Prostate Years in the midst of an outpouring of Christmas presents, many of which included novels, annuals and book tokens, I was spoiled for literary choice over the holidays, and almost didn't know where to start.

However, Adrian has remained my first love ever since the day I picked up my dad's battered old copy of 'The Secret Diary'. He would have to be read first, no questions asked.

I hurried through the book feverently, but was hit with bitter disappointment as I As I started reading The Prostate Years in the midst of an outpouring of Christmas presents, many of which included novels, annuals and book tokens, I was spoiled for literary choice over the holidays, and almost didn't know where to start.

I hurried through the book feverently, but was hit with bitter disappointment as I sped-read through the last few entries.

I dearly hope that Sue Townsend hasn't decided to call it a day as far as her greatest character is concerned. Despite his ever-changing and often ridiculous circumstances, Adrian as a character has never changed.

Even at 40 years of age, he is still naive to his wayward wife's adultery with the local landlord, tactless but only on occasion and weak when it comes to handling his eccentric little girl, Gracie, and jealous of his half-siblings, Rosie and Brett and the attention they receive from his parents, Pauline and George.

And then of course, there is his benign love for Pandora, a desire for her which transcends throughout the series from his 's hormone-ridden schooldays.

However, each and every one of Adrian's vast problems is put into perspective when he receives some gut-wrenching news from his GP Townsend's treatment of Adrian from the beginning is unabashed and harsh, as she continuously sends him on wild escapades and gives him so much self-absorption and naivety that he is set up for some sort of downfall; in this novel, however, the main battle he faces is dealt with delicately and empathically.

The great thing is that Adrian's character remains constant throughout each and every difficulty; pitying his life and longing for an existence of respect, literary success and, of course, Ms.

The humour synonymous with Townsend's style, and this series in particular, is still there, but different in the sense that instead of laughing bitterly at Adrian and his pathetic situations, instead we feel his pain and journey through the book alongside him, tittering at what we observe along the way.

I sincerely hope that this is not the last in a brilliant line of diaries, as for once Sue treats Adrian with a bit of - well, if not happiness then inner peace at last - and I would love to see this chapter in his life developed.

If it is the end, hoever, then at least Adrian has not been conquered by his problems, and we see him finally acheive some sort of hope, and leave behind a chapter of his life to walk into the sunset horizon All in all a humourous but touching read about life and how it can seem pointless at times, but how there is a reason for all the pointlessness.

A must for any fans of the series; just because Adrian is getting old doesn't mean his comic value is too! Aug 03, Gemma Scott rated it it was amazing.

My favourite of the Adrian Mole series. The book where I connected to him most. Unlike other reviewers I've always liked Adrian Mole as a character despite his many flaws but in this book because of the fact he had cancer and because he had matured e.

I also enjoyed reading about Bernard, the alcoholic booklover, who plays a greater part i My favourite of the Adrian Mole series.

I also enjoyed reading about Bernard, the alcoholic booklover, who plays a greater part in this book.

Apr 16, Ben Baker rated it really liked it. I can't deny I've been putting off finishing this one for a while now.

Despite its excruciating romantic plots, " Mass Destruction" once again left Adrian happy and loved. A few years on and reality has come crashing back in with a strained marriage, stroppy daughter, mooching half-brother, son still fighting the Taliban and a failing bookshop pushing Mole back to the safety of his diaries.

Things still manage to get worse when Adrian becomes ill. Funny but painful, like it was happening to a I can't deny I've been putting off finishing this one for a while now.

Funny but painful, like it was happening to a close friend, which in many ways, he has become. The ending will probably not satisfy traditionalists, not least of all now it has become the default ending by Townsend's tragic death but then nothing was ever simple in the world of Adrian Mole.

You will both be missed hugely. Very disappointed to note that Adrian Mole, who was always a year older than me, has somehow lost a year making us the same age.

Who will I look up to now? I blame the publishers, simply because Sue Townsend can do no wrong. I will be writing to my MP on the matter in the strongest of terms.

Does anyone have Dr Braithwaite's address? Adrian goes through the book moaning that people can't spell the name of his troublesome gland correctly and as a result I mis-type the name of the book when searching for it.

Adrian 1 - CaterinaAnna 0 I first met Adrian in the pages of Woman's Realm in , when I was just enough older than him to feel superior, and each new installment of his diaries is like getting a news-filled letter from a friend one hears from infrequently enough for it to contain plenty of news, but frequently enough for Adrian goes through the book moaning that people can't spell the name of his troublesome gland correctly and as a result I mis-type the name of the book when searching for it.

Adrian 1 - CaterinaAnna 0 I first met Adrian in the pages of Woman's Realm in , when I was just enough older than him to feel superior, and each new installment of his diaries is like getting a news-filled letter from a friend one hears from infrequently enough for it to contain plenty of news, but frequently enough for one not to wonder why they've bothered.

In his forties, Adrian still has all the faults that make us cringe and wonder why we love him, but he has had some of the rough edges rubbed off and greets yet another lost job, lost wife and disappointing child with his usual bewildered acceptance.

Pandora is still his ideal, in spite of continuing to use him for her own ends, but she even she is not enough to make up for the reality Adrian has to bear in this book.

As ever, simultaneously hilarious and sad. View 2 comments. Nov 20, J. So, farewell then, Adrian Mole, the 80s parody of parochial adolescence which mutated into the author's most well-received series of satirical soapboxes on modern-day Britain.

Plotlines which were presumably destined for resolution in later books turn into cul-de-sacs. We'll never know how, or if, the stories were goin So, farewell then, Adrian Mole, the 80s parody of parochial adolescence which mutated into the author's most well-received series of satirical soapboxes on modern-day Britain.

We'll never know how, or if, the stories were going to end. Although that's assuming they were going to end at all: one of the prominent characters in 'Weapons of Mass Destruction' is absent without explanation.

Five years have passed, sure, but not even a passing mention? Townsend's arc with Mole in the later books is always to begin with the happiness Mole concludes the previous book with and gradually strip it away, but even by these standards, the coal-black abyss that Adrian is sentenced to here is like something out of a Russian play.

Adulterous wife, job in difficulties, cancer - and that's just for starters. But then maybe that's the point.

Life at the bottom of the social ladder isn't easy. When you're seriously considering your appearance on 'Jeremy Kyle' and your best suit has been ruined because you left Starburst in it, there's nothing more than gallows humour getting you through it.

Plus, this is after all an Adrian Mole book, and there's even something resembling fan service towards the end. We'll have to hope that Mole found the happiness that eluded him throughout the series, as it sure as heck deserted him here.

Adrian Mole has been making me laugh since I was 13, and he's still doing it now that I'm 29 It's my birthday today! He's now at the grand old age of 39 and is on his third marriage.

And still not been published by the BBC! I think the reason I, and so many others like these books, is that you can find situations in here that you recognise in your own family and sometimes in yourself.

Adrian's mum telling the story of his birth on his birthday for example. Every year! I know someone like this Adrian Mole has been making me laugh since I was 13, and he's still doing it now that I'm 29 It's my birthday today!

I know someone like this ; hi mum! The commentary on politics is hilarious and I laughed out loud so many times.

I'm really sad that this is the last book. I would have loved to read Adrian's thoughts on Brexit and Trump! If you haven't read any of the Mole books yet, why not?

Surely these books are a teenage rite of passage. Head to the nearest bookstore immediately. View all 4 comments.

Jun 15, Iona Stewart rated it it was amazing. Adrian is now approaching 40, his son Glenn is in Afghanistan fighting the Taliban, Adrian is having problems with his prostate and his marriage to Daisy is falling apart.

Adrian is living in a converted pigsty and working at a bookshop. Mr Carlton-Hughes who owns the bookshop is ill. He is still an incessant letter-wri Adrian is now approaching 40, his son Glenn is in Afghanistan fighting the Taliban, Adrian is having problems with his prostate and his marriage to Daisy is falling apart.

He is still an incessant letter-writer. He writes to a man who has attained the advanced age of pestering him about how he has kept his hair.

Apparently Adrian has not. He has written a play, Plague! He informs us that he is 20 per cent agnostic and 80 per cent atheist, but still feels guilty about not going to church.

Tony Blair has finally resigned as leader of the Labour party and will be standing down as P. Gordon Brown is the new PM and Adrian immediately commences to write to him and ask him to look into his tax affairs.

Daisy now weighs thirteen stone twelve ounces, which would be great if she were a light-heavyweight boxer. It is raining incessantly.

On Sunday 1st July smoking in a public place or place of work is forbidden. This is no doubt taken from real life. Daisy meets Hugo Fairfax-Lycett, soon to be her lover.

It turns out that Adrian has cancer so his life revolves around his visits to the hospital for chemo treatments.

I understand from the dedications at the beginning of the book that Sue Townsend herself had health problems while writing the book and in general I know had severe health problems.

As always with Adrian his unusual family are causing endless problems, his marriage is not working, his daughter rules their home and her school, the bookstore where Adrian works is about to close and Adrian has some health concerns.

What I love most about the Adrian Mole books is their humour and how they show all aspects of family life, my favourite character is George Mole, Adrian's Dad, whose one liners are memorable throughout all the books, in 'The Prostate Years', you see a softer side to him.

A funny, poignant read, enjoy! Having grown up with Adrian Mole, I was desperately hoping that this one would not disappoint.

It didn't. Great fun start to finish. The opening couple of weeks in particular - getting you back into the picture, reminding you of characters whilst introducing new ones etc.

They had me laughing out loud on more than one occasion. Despite the deep, dark, potentially miserable core of the subject matter, Townsend keeps it light and refreshing, as we never stop rooting for the path Having grown up with Adrian Mole, I was desperately hoping that this one would not disappoint.

Despite the deep, dark, potentially miserable core of the subject matter, Townsend keeps it light and refreshing, as we never stop rooting for the pathetic Mole, even as we mock his scruppleless existence.

There were some sections that were not as polished - in that they felt that they had been put in as big gags but never truly followed through such as the credit card payments for his wife's and mother's Christmas presents , but they could not detract from a great novel overall.

Well done Mole and Townsend: you've done it again and long may you continue. Adrian and I had lost contact since adolesence but, by sheer coincidence and not without some irony, bumped into each other again both aged Mole continues to be self centred whilst also being adrift on the ebbs and tides of life: 1 part tosser, 1 part underdog, a dash of adversity mixed with a cast of misfits.

The genius of Townsend's character is that the reader well, this one at least can see so much of themselves in this protagonist whilst simultaneously hoping these observations Adrian and I had lost contact since adolesence but, by sheer coincidence and not without some irony, bumped into each other again both aged The genius of Townsend's character is that the reader well, this one at least can see so much of themselves in this protagonist whilst simultaneously hoping these observations are not what others see in them.

For all Adrian's foibles he remains an endearing character and reading this installment was like rekindling an old friendship - simultaneously awkward yet comfortable.

Aug 05, Hannah Wingfield rated it it was amazing. I was supposed to be starting A Little Life whilst I was away but couldn't get further than about pages.

Anyway, I first read this when it came out about 10 years ago as I've been a massive Sue Townsend fan for about 20 years now but couldn't remember much about it.

In it Adrian Mole has a failing marriage, a young daughter,an adult son in 4. In it Adrian Mole has a failing marriage, a young daughter,an adult son in the army and another son from whom he is estranged and lives close to his parents in a Leicestershire village.

He also gets diagnosed with, and treated for, cancer during this book. I loved the minor characters especially Bernard, Mr C-H and Leslie; and it's good that Nigel and Pandora are still there in the books and there for Adrian.

I remembered this as having a sad ending, but it wasn't really - Adrian discovers a love of nature and the story closes in a way that feels non-abrupt and open-ended, shortly after his 40th birthday.

It feels like a fitting end to the series though I'm sorry Sue Townsend isn't still with us, writing great books like this Jul 05, Fiona rated it really liked it.

Just finished this great book. Ive been reading about Adrian Mole since the first book many years ago. This book is quite sad in many ways as things continue to go wrong for him.

I did find it gripping wanting to read on and see if things improved. As always there is a lovely sense of humour in all Sue Townsends books.

Im quite sure she was going to write a further book, but sadly due to her death we will never know. If you have read all the other books in the series then this is a must.

Still fu Just finished this great book. Still fun, still thoughtful, still interesting things to think about.

Back to the standard of the original. Jun 11, Alec Downie rated it did not like it. Jul 05, Andy Angel rated it it was amazing.

As always things are not going well for our generations greatest diarist. Lost count of the number of times I've read this series over the years but every time I come back to it it is an absolute joy.

And the final diary entry of the Mole Diaries is possibly the most perfect of endings. Jul 11, Megan Baxter rated it liked it.

I have read all the Adrian Mole books - indeed, I was delighted when the library catalogue told me there were two I didn't realize had been published!

Or, you know, Sue Townsend's. It felt less topical - the last two were both extremely topical and sharp-tongued about current events and celebrity, and this one, set geograp I have read all the Adrian Mole books - indeed, I was delighted when the library catalogue told me there were two I didn't realize had been published!

It felt less topical - the last two were both extremely topical and sharp-tongued about current events and celebrity, and this one, set geographically further afield, was more about just Adrian himself, and less about the world around him.

But here's my real issue - so many of the things in this book happened to him, because he was unlucky or in the wrong place at the wrong time, or just 'cause.

Adrian Mole has always been a bit of a hapless character, true, but he's always gotten himself into trouble, in true gormless fashion, and then helplessly looked for a way out.

This time, he seemed much more acted upon than an actor which is not to clear him of all culpability in his marriage breaking down , and it wasn't as fun or funny.

Townsend adapted the book for the stage in with music by Ken Howard and Alan Blaikley. There was also a television series.

A successful stage production ran at the Wyndham's Theatre , London, in , that included Simon Gipps-Kent and followed with a road tour.

Townsend had been working on the project at the time of her death in From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. This article needs additional citations for verification.

Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. Financial Times.

The Times. BBC News. Retrieved The reveal kickstarts the BBC's year-long celebration of literature. Adrian Mole by Sue Townsend.

Hinton Where's Wally? Rowling The Lord of the Rings by J. Rowling

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Adrian Mole : The Cappuccino Years Episode 1 Hidden categories: Pages containing links to subscription-only content Webarchive template wayback links Articles needing additional references from July All articles needing additional references All stub articles. It's not perfect, and it's damn South Park Season 22. Sad to hear https://designarsenal.co/deutsche-filme-online-stream/buckethead.php Sue Tonwsend's passing. The ending was so abrupt, I thought the author just wrote the whole book series at once, and told the publisher https://designarsenal.co/filme-schauen-stream/flash-cast.php chop it click here they needed to make them into perfectly identical books. When his Battleship Stream Kinox puts him straight, he shrugs and goes back Adrian Mole bed. I am definitely a Somebody. So sweet and so funny! There's a lot to admire in Adrian in this volume. As ever, simultaneously hilarious and sad.

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